Mayor Proclaims Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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Published on October 8 2013 6:48 pm
Last Updated on October 8 2013 6:48 pm
Written by Greg Sapp

(EFFINGHAM MAYOR MERV GILLENWATER SIGNS THE PROCLAMATION DESIGNATING OCTOBER 2013 AS BREAST CANCER AWARENESS MONTH.  THE MAYOR IS SURROUNDED BY MARILYN BOONE, ST. ANTHONY'S MEMORIAL HOSPITAL'S WOMEN'S WELLNESS MANAGER; DR. RUBEN BOYAJIAN, ST. ANTHONY'S MEDICAL DIRECTOR OF WOMEN'S WELLNESS AND CANCER CARE SERVICES; AND SUSAN KOONTZ, ST. ANTHONY'S MAMMOGRAPHY FACILITATOR)

Effingham Mayor Mervin D. Gillenwater recently signed a proclamation designating October 2013 as Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  

The proclamation states that since October is recognized as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and approximately 9,350 Illinois women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2013 according to the American Cancer Society, the Mayor proclaims October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month and urges all women to take precautions to prevent breast cancer. Joining the Mayor as he signed the proclamation were Ruben Boyajian, MD, St. Anthony’s Medical Director of Women’s Wellness and Cancer Care Services; Marilyn Boone, St. Anthony’s Women’s Wellness Manager; and Susan Koontz, RT(R),C,M, St. Anthony’s Mammography Facilitator. 

St. Anthony’s Women’s Wellness and Community Relations departments are leading the hospital’s “Real Men Wear Pink” breast cancer awareness campaign in October.  Breast cancer is the second most common form of cancer in women.  Of the 9,350 women in Illinois estimated to be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, it is expected that 1,610 women will die of the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.  Research shows that deaths from breast cancer could be reduced if women follow breast cancer screening recommendations, including routine mammography, regular examinations by a physician, and monthly breast self-examinations.  Mammography can identify breast abnormalities that may be cancerous at earlier stages when treatment is more effective and cure more likely.  Numerous studies have shown that early detection increase survival and treatment options.  The five-year survival rate for breast cancers found in the earliest stages is 98 percent. 

For more information about mammography or scheduling a mammogram, contact St. Anthony’s Women’s Wellness at 217-347-1601.